I'm Doing This

Print this story

Share on Facebook

Share on Twitter

Comments

Though Alonna Mertz of St. Clair, Michigan, used to volunteer at a pro-life pregnancy resource center and served for two years as a Catholic missionary, she found herself one day walking through the doors of an abortion clinic to have her own abortion. "Emotionally and spiritually everything was shut down, and I had gone into survival mode," she said. Thankfully, the Lord intervened.

Alonna was raised Catholic by a single mother and grew up living adjacent to her grandparents. In 2010, she became a missionary for National Evangelization Teams (NET), which ministers the Gospel to young people. "That was my dream job to do retreats, all the while having a community of [other missionaries] by your side to encourage and sharpen you. It was perfect, I loved it."

How did a devout Catholic excited about evangelization wind up in an abortion clinic? "Don't give the evil one a foothold," she said. "I gave him lots of little footholds I didn't think were issues."

After finishing NET, she applied to graduate school, but didn't get accepted. "I had been very interested in a man, and he was moving away for the degree that I had wanted to do. There was a lot of heartache. And instead of turning to the Lord and letting Him walk through that heartache with me, I turned to this [other] man who I knew was no good."

They had met through mutual friends, and in January 2017, they started dating. "He kept pursuing me, so I thought, 'all right, we'll date for a month, then break up, and it will be done because we are so incompatible.'"

Despite herself, she remained in the relationship longer than she had intended. In June, she took a pregnancy test. "It was positive, and I cried," she said. "I just said, 'I can't do this.' I apologized to my child, 'I'm so sorry you're not being raised in a home where both parents love each other, and it's healthy. I'm sorry I can't give you everything I'm supposed to give you.' Then I just kind of spiritually shut down at that point."

The thought came to her that she just shouldn't tell anyone and schedule an abortion. "It was a horrible, horrible time," she said. When she arrived at the clinic, she saw people praying in front. "I used to be one of those people praying in front of abortion clinics!" she said. Inside the clinic, she didn't have a good feeling. "I went in: It was sterile, cold, and miserable. Every single woman in there was miserable," she said.

While she sat in the waiting room with a clipboard in her hand, she heard a child cry from somewhere else in the clinic. "I looked around, and I saw that everyone else heard it, too. My heart began to panic. I said, 'That was a human life. You just heard it.' And I began to panic, thinking, 'I can't have an abortion.' ... During the ultrasound, I was thinking to myself, 'I can't do this, I can't do this, I can't do this.'"

As if the technician performing the ultrasound could hear Alonna's internal dialogue, she turned to Alonna and said, 'We can't do this. I can't see anything on the ultrasound, so we can't confirm that you're pregnant. You're welcome to reschedule at the front desk."

Alonna didn't say anything. She hurried out of the clinic and into her car where she sobbed, "'Thank You, God. Thank You, thank You, thank You.' ... There was no biological reason something didn't show up on the ultrasound."

She immediately called the pro-life clinic she used to volunteer for. "I went in, and they were warm and kind, the waiting room was open and airy, and it was so beautiful. The moment we started the ultrasound, you could hear the heartbeat so loud and clear."

Then the technician asked, "You know you're having twins, right?" Alonna laughed, thinking the technician was joking. "Sure enough, they showed me 'baby a' and 'baby b,'" Alonna said.

Once Alonna decided against abortion, she leaned more upon her faith. "Satan picked on my fears of, 'You can't be a single mom,'" Alonna said. Her relationship with the Blessed Mother gave her strength to face her fears. "'Mary, you lived this, albeit under significantly holier circumstances.' Still, she was also a young mother who wasn't prepared but still gave that 'yes' in trust."

Alonna also received plenty of help from others. Her two daughters were born on Feb. 2, 2018. "It's so hard being a single mother, but so doable. Once I had the strength to say, 'I'm doing this,' I did it. I swallowed my pride and asked for help. There was just so much help available, and that's what I want to offer to other mothers ... that you just have to ask for it."

Today, Alonna advocates for pro-life issues through public speaking and by volunteering at her local pregnancy resource center.

Print this story

Share on Facebook

Share on Twitter

Comments

Be a part of the discussion. Add a comment now!