Champions of the Rosary


"In Champions of the Rosary, Fr. Calloway has written what is probably the... Read more


$16.95


Buy Now


The Beads of the Rosary

Print this story

Share on Facebook

Share on Twitter

Comments

By Marc Massery (Dec 4, 2018)
Sister M. Gerard O'Donnell, OSF, who works at Scots College in Rome, Italy, composed the following poem after reading Marian Fr. Donald Calloway's book Champions of the Rosary: The History and Heroes of a "Spiritual Weapon. She wrote it while still hoping Ireland would vote against a referendum in May 2018 that called for legalized abortion. Though the law sadly passed, this poem reminds us of the mentality with which we ought to pray for our nations to pass laws upholding the dignity of human life.

By Sr. M. Gerard O'Donnell, OSF

Two lines of battle faced each other that day
On the green fields of Ireland in the sweet month of May.
Like a battle that raged many years so they say
'tween Christ's Church and its foes on the fields of Morey.
"All flesh is evil so Christ didn't come.
There was no crucifixion," they beat on their drum.
"No Resurrection, nor ascension, nor any such story.
Only spirit is good,* God alone deserves glory."

The lines were drawn up numbering 20 to one.
The heretics just laughed for in their minds they had won.
They caroused and drank till the break of the day,
While the Church in her wisdom prepared prayerfully.
With Rosary in hand, they pledged to the one
Who as commander in chief had given birth to the Son.
In true flesh and blood in a stable long ago,
The fight was now on to conquer the foe.

Like trees that were felled by an army of jacks,
So the historians recorded in their various tracts,
That Rosary has a power, it's a spiritual sword,
As the red fields in Morey testify and record.
Yet another bloody battle rages this year
Like a storm-tossed vessel on an angry sea.
But with Mary at the helm with her faithful band
No harm can befall with the Rosary in hand.

The battle rages in green Ireland so sad.
Will the fields turn red with an evil so bad?
That if passed the cruel law will betray the unborn,
Leaving in its wake a land bereft and forlorn.
On the 25th day of May, they stood face to face,
Two lines of battle disgraced versus grace,
A battle that declares whether life comes from God
Or the proud sons of Adam who are naught but the sod.
God's word, if you read, says, "Do not kill."

What nation can be so blind, so hard, and so ill?
Like the soldiers in Morey, long, long ago
With their pleasure and passion joined ranks with the foe.
Now here in Ireland, we still have a choice.
Let's unsheathe our Rosaries, give the unborn a voice!
Their lives hang in the balance as His did then.
Who will plead their cause against the cold threats of men?
Will the voices once more cry "crucify Him!"

As mothers and fathers condemn their babes to the tomb,
Are we not all part of this mystical Head
Who overcame evil and rose from the dead?
O Mary, God's mother, you are our mother on high.
Be a mother to your children, don't allow them to die.
Let our Rosaries tip the scales to fall in their favour.
Be with young mothers as they go into labour.

With her foot Mary crushes the heads of the hydra.
In their darkness they rejoice at the goal they have strived for.
But Mary assured of the victory above.
Through tears sees her children with a heart full of love.
The victims she said are not the unborn.
But the mothers whose wombs have been brutally torn,
The fathers, politicians, the medics, and all,
Deceived, just like Eve, at the time of the fall.

A victory, a glorious victory, is looming ahead.
What power can help draw them back from the dead?
A lifeline is thrown — it's the beads on a cord,
Our Mother's blessed Rosary — that spiritual sword.

*Albigensian heresy claimed that all flesh was evil and only spirit was good.

Print this story

Share on Facebook

Share on Twitter

Comments

Be a part of the discussion. Add a comment now!